1

ram for windows 7 professional

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how much will windows 7 professional actually use? will i waste my money to put 4 gigs in

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30

Ask-A-Geek.com WordPress v.04

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Hot fix update

If you downloaded the AAG WordPress Remote Poster before September 09, 2011 please redownload the zip file again and reinstall it. There was a bug that was missed prior to rollout and although it won’t affect the functionality of the script from a user stand point, there was still something that had to be fixed.

All you have to do is redownload the file. You can copy your configuration from your working copy over the configuration of the new copy. No changes to the config section was made so it could be a seamless install.

UPDATE:It hasn’t been two days since its official release and we’ve had HUNDREDS of downloads already! Thank you! And remember, if you want a free backlink to your blog be sure to use the metrics option as public!

Download

Download v.04 of the Ask-A-Geek.com WordPress Poster [here]

Overview:

The Ask-A-Geek.com WordPress Poster enables a WordPress blogger to literally submit content to their blogs at any time from any where, so long as there is an internet connection. Sometimes it is more convenient to write yourself an email or type up a multi-post TXT file and send it over to your web server than it is to load your blog and manually create posts.

Tip: For bloggers who like to blog at work but fear getting in trouble from visiting your blog! You never have to launch your blog at all, all you need is to send an email to yourself and WOALA! The posts will automatically appear on your blog!

Features:

  • Post to your WordPress blog from ANYWHERE there is an internet connection!
  • Automatically post to your WordPress blog through email!
  • Automatically post to your WordPress blog through FTP!
  • The only WordPress remote poster that allows unlimited posts per attachment/ftp log AND unlimited attachment/ftp log scanning. Load up hundreds of posts at once if you want!
  • Fully documented tag system with examples so you know how to use the system
  • The only WordPress remote poster that fixes the “smart quotes” problem!
  • The only WordPress remote poster that allows you to post under ANY registered account (author rights or above)! That’s right, you can have others post content to your blog with their accounts!
  • Optional metrics allowing free linkbacks to your blog
  • Easy to set up and get going in under 10 minutes!

    Requirements:

  • Web server with Perl
  • Mail::Pop3Client perl module (not standard)
  • Mail::MboxParser::Mail perl module (not standard)
  • List::Util perl module (standard)
  • WWW::Mechanize perl module (standard)

    Installation:

    1) Transfer aagwpposter.pl to your web server (typically in the cgi-bin)

    2) Set the file permissions (chmod) of the aagwpposter.pl file to 755

    3) Make sure you have the required Perl modules installed. You may need to ask your web host to install the non-standard ones if they aren’t already installed

    4) Configure the script as detailed below.

    How to use this script:

    1) Decide if you want to use FTP or Email, or both

    2) Write yourself a .txt or .log file with the shortcodes and tags and attach it to your email or upload it to your site’s FTP location. (note: when using email, the content of the email is ignored. The only thing the script looks at are attachments).

    3) Load the aagwpposter.pl script in your browser to make it “work”. Loading the script directly will make it scan the FTP or email locations and post the content to the blog. OR set up a chron job to run the script every X minutes or X hours. This can be done through Cpanel. If you have questions setting up a chron job, try asking your web host for assistance. My settings are set up to run the script every 10 minutes automatically.

    Configurations:

    Incoming Email/Server settings
    $email_user Change to email address the script will be loading emails from
    $email_pass Change to password of above mentioned email account
    $email_server Change to mail server name, ie: mail.yourdomain.com
    $file_backup Change to full file path of directory to store backup files. Ie: /home/user/public_html/folder. Do not include a trailing /.
    $tag_check Set to 1 if you want the script to test for proper shortcodes. Script will not publish posts that contain errors. Set to 0 to not check for errors.
    $server_backup Set to 1 to back up all posts to the server as log files. Otherwise set to 0.
    $check_where Set to 1 for script to check an email account for content. Set to 2 for script to check an FTP location. Set to 3 for the script to check both email AND ftp locations.
    $ftp_loc Change to full file path of FTP location where it should check for content. Do not add trailing /.
    $rem_smart_quotes Set to 1 if you want the script to repair “smart quotes”. Othewise set to 0.
    Outgoing email settings (for confirmation email)
    $path_to_sendmail Change to location of sendmail. Typically it is /usr/sbin/sendmail
    $email Change to email address the confirmation email will be sent to
    $from_email Change to the FROM email address for the confirmation email to be sent from
    $subject Change to the message you want the confirmation email to use
    $verification Set to 1 if you want to receive confirmation of each post. Otherwise set to 0
    WordPress settings (to sign in and post to WordPress)
    $url_to_sign_on Change to the location of the wp-login.php file. Typically: http://www.yourdomain.com/wp-login.php
    $post_new Change to the location of the post-new.php file. Typically: http://www.yourdomain.com/wp-admin/post-new.php
    Metrics settings
    $use_metrics Set to ‘yes’ to use metrics. Otherwise set to ‘no’
    $metric_type Set to ‘public’, ‘anony’, or ‘limited’.

    public: Tells the server how many posts you published via the script, the URL of your web site, the last post title and the last post link. *

    private: Tells the server how many posts you published via the script and the url of your web site. *

    anonymous: Tells the server how many posts you published via the script and the url of your web site (URL of web site is not made public). *

    * Other metrics that are recorded for all three options: whether or not you allowed gratitude_link, script version number. These metrics are always kept private.

    $gratitude_link Set to ‘yes’ to allow a small linkback to Ask-A-Geek.com at the bottom of each post. Set to ‘no’ to not allow the linkback. Set to ‘maybe’ to post the linkback on approximately 10% of the posts.

    Why opt in to use metrics? It helps us track usage of the script to see how frequent we should update its features. Allowing metrics and choosing the non-anonymous options allows free publicity and a free link back to your site! Anyone who opts in will have their URLs posted.

    Shortcodes:

    All shortcodes with exception to [:start] and ########## must appear twice to enclose the information for the shortcode. For example, to specify a particular post category the code would look like: [:categories]12[:categories].

    The [:start] shortcode has to be the first shortcode in the attachment or log file. It is used only once to tell the WordPress script where to start looking at content.

    The ########## shortcode is used to separate one attachment or log file into separate posts. This means it is possible to create one email attachment that contains any number of posts to create. To separate posts, use ########## between them.

    **DO NOT USE A SECOND [:start] SHORTCODE BETWEEN POSTS IN THE SAME ATTACHMENT OR LOG FILE!

    **DO NOT USE ########## AT THE END OF THE LAST POST IN THE ATTACHMENT OR LOG FILE!

    **YOU MUST, HOWEVER, USE A [:start] SHORTCODE AT THE TOP OF EACH ATTACHMENT OR LOG FILE!

    The shortcode should be self explanatory. Wrap the post title in [:title], tags in [:tags] separated by a comma, categories in [:categories], the content of the post in [:post] and status in [:status]. You’ll need to look at the HTML code to look for the category ID numbers to use this.

    The [:status] tag is different. It will publish in draft mode if this shortcode isn’t defined or set to publish. Set [:status]publish[:status] to make the post go live instantly.

    All shortcodes other than [:start] can appear in any order and they aren’t all required. The [:author] and [:password] shortcodes ARE required. If authentication is left off or fails, that particular post will not succeed. Whatever shortcodes you leave out will not be defined in the post.

    Complete list of shortcodes
    Start of email [:start]
    Author username [:author]
    Author password [:password]
    Post title [:title]
    Post tags [:tags]
    Post categories [:categories]
    Post content [:post]
    Post status [:status]
    Post separator ##########

    Shortcode Examples:

    Example 1: Use of all tags in one post

    [:start]

    [:author]frosty[:author]

    [:password]snowman[:password]

    [:title]Hello world![:title]

    [:tags]hello world, this is cool[:tags]

    [:categories]1[:categories]

    [:status]publish[:status]

    [:post]

    This was posted with Ask-A-Geek.com’s free WordPress poster!

    Yay!

    [:post]

    Example 2: More than one post in same attachment or log file AND not all codes used

    [:start]

    [:author]frosty[:author]

    [:password]snowman[:password]

    [:title]Hello world![:title]

    [:tags]another test, and more tags[:tags]

    [:categories]1[:categories]

    [:status]publish[:status]

    [:post]

    This was posted with Ask-A-Geek.com’s free WordPress poster!

    Yay!

    [:post]

    ##########

    [:title]Another example with fewer tags[:title]

    [:author]frosty[:author]

    [:password]snowman[:password]

    [:post]

    This was posted with Ask-A-Geek.com’s free WordPress poster!

    Yay!
    [:post]

    See it in action!!

    We have set up a fully functional version of this script for you to demo. Below you’ll find a sample post you can copy and paste into a .txt document and send to our mailbox at demowp@ask-a-geek.com. Feel free to change what it says, the order of the tags, remove some tags, etc (don’t remove the few required tags!). Note: The contents of the email and subject are ignored. Only attachments are parsed.

    As this is a demo, all of the posts are set up to go to our special category regardless of what you change that shortcode to. Also note the password for this user account is not the true password (so don’t try), the demo knows the real password. So although the field isn’t accurate, it still needs to exist in the script to prevent it from failing.

    Create your attachments, send them to demowp@ask-a-geek.com and check them out [here]! The demo is set up to run off a chron job every 5 minutes, however if you are impatient and don’t want to wait you can launch the script directly [here]!

    Feel free to customize this for testing!

    [:start]
    [:author]wpposter[:author]
    [:password]test[:password]
    [:tags]test post, wordpress poster, ask-a-geek.com[:tags]
    [:title]Hello everybody! This was posted with the AAG WordPress poster![:title]
    [:categories]22[:categories]
    [:status]publish[:status]
    [:post]
    This is a test post I created to see
    How this script would make my blogging life EASY!
    [:post]
    ##########
    [:author]wpposter[:author]
    [:password]test[:password]
    [:tags]second post in same text[:tags]
    [:title]Hello everybody! This was posted with the AAG WordPress poster![:title]
    [:categories]22[:categories]
    [:status]publish[:status]
    [:post]
    This is the second post in the same attachment. Only AAG WordPress poster has this ability!
    [:post]

    Special Thanks

    We would like to thank Paul (from http://www.workathometruth.com) for the hours he put in testing the Ask-A-Geek.com Remote WordPress Poster script and offering new ideas to improve its performance. If it weren’t for him, the FTP parser and “smart quote” filtering wouldn’t have been imagined in this update. Thank you for your help!

    Questions/Comments?

    For any questions or comments, please go to http://www.ask-a-geek.com. Look through the main threads for this script or start your own question!

    If you want to use the script but don’t have Perl installed or don’t want to try the installation yourself, please post on the boards at the above link. There are people around who’ll be able to help you.

    License Information

    This script is provided free of charge by http://www.Ask-A-Geek.com. Because it is free we do not guarantee or warantee the script in any way. We are not responsible for any issues it may cause.

    You may modify the script to suit your needs. You may not distribute any modified versions of this script, even without monetary gain, or customize it for others.

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  • 2

    My experiences rooting the HTC Hero and applying my first ROM

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    There is a lot of information out there on how to do this and that in order to get a custom ROM on your phone. Instead of just telling you what to do with yours I’ll share my experiences ROMing my HTC Hero. Since this is my first attempt at rooting my Hero and applying a phone ROM I’ll try to explain everything in the order I did things and the questions/problems/successes I run into. I am by no means a subject matter expert on phone ROMs but if you, too, are looking to get your first ROM working then this “experience guide” will likely prove helpful. If nothing else, you’ll learn from my mistakes and save countless hours of time and frustration.

    1) Installing some software (backup and root checker)
    The first thing I did was install Titanium Backup (free version) from the Marketplace. It has great reviews and everyone says you dang well better back up your phone settings or bad things can happen! So this is the app I chose to work with.

    On the download page it showed similar applications I might be interested in so I clicked on one called Root Checker and installed this one too. It’s free, has great ratings, and it tells you whether or not your phone is rooted. It’ll likely come in handy later just to verify the successful HTC Hero root. After Root Checker finished installing I ran it just to see what it was. It’s very simple and with one click it said my phone DOES NOT HAVE root access. Great! I know the app is working.

    Next thing I did was open Titanium Backup (free version) and it errored out with “Sorry, I could not acquire root privileges.” Whoops! Guess I have to root the phone before this app is going to work. Let’s do that next.

    2) Installing the root APK
    The ROOT APK I downloaded was from http://cache.techie-buzz.com/images/mobiles/arnaw/downloads/instant-root.zip . If you don’t have a ZIP reader on your phone you’ll have to go to the Marketplace and download any of a hundred free ZIP apps. I use AndroZip. When you download the ZIP file you need to save it into the /sdcard root. DO NOT SAVE IT INSIDE ANY DIRECTORIES. This was a warning on most of the sites I referenced. Better safe than sorry!

    Once it downloaded, I opened the ZIP reader and found the InstallRoot.apk file and clicked it. Then I clicked Install from the options. A permission window popped up like any other application and after saying yes it only took about 2 seconds to complete. Is it rooted now? I better double check by using the root checker app I downloaded a few minutes ago.

    3) Checking root access
    After opening Root Checker again and running a verification it says it failed because root is not available on the phone. I closed the program and reopened it a second time with the same results. Just to make sure I tried to use the Titanium Backup program again but that, too, says I don’t have root access. In minor frustration I thought maybe a total reboot of the phone will work. It boots back up, I test the programs again, and same results. Now I’m getting a little more frustrated.

    After a couple hours of looking at forums I found a different program to root the phone. This one is called z4root and is a free download from http://handheld.softpedia.com/dyn-postdownload.php?p=110178&t=4&i=1. Same thing as before, save it to your phone and use a file manager to open the APK file. While running the program it was doing something for about 5 minutes and then a message popped up saying REBOOTING. I didn’t know what to do so I let it sit for about 45 minutes and nothing rebooted or changed. I manually hit the power button to reboot the phone and upon reboot I launched the root checker and it said I had root access! Yay!

    4) Backups
    After running Titanium Backup everything seemed so time consuming. Even with the batch job feature it still requires a LOT of clicks to get everything backed up. After downloading a number of other backup apps I came across MyBackup Root from the market place. It’s free and worked WONDERFULLY! There may be some better ones out there but this one was free and didn’t require a lot of time on my part. Just to be sure though I did write down the contact names and numbers from my address book. Once the backup was done I connected to my computer and dumped the backup files and everything from my SD card. Can’t be too safe!

    5) Flashing a recovery image

    Already put in about 4.5 hours of time prior to this step, finding out exactly what I needed to do to get a recovery image for the HTC hero proved disappointing. About an hour more into it I found a Rom Manager by Clockwork Mod in the Marketplace. Some people said this one works GREAT and it’s completely GUI based. Once it installed I just opened it and clicked Flash ClockworkMod Recovery. It took a few minutes but was very, very easy. Finally, an easy step!

    6) Downloading the final ROM and making everything work
    I chose Cyanogen 7 (CM7) as the ROM to install on this HTC Hero. The latest stable version for me was http://download.cyanogenmod.com/get/update-cm-7.1.0-RC1-Heroc-signed.zip. It was downloaded and placed directly on the root of the SD card. From there I reopened the ClockwordMod Recovery app and chose the Backup and Restore option to perform a backup of my CURRENT rom. I don’t know what this does that the previous image download I did earlier but I couldn’t pass up yet one more backup. Now a lot of things have to go wrong before my data isn’t recoverable which gives me a sigh of relief. The ClockwordMod Recovery took about 15 minutes to complete but it was completely automated.

    After the backup was completed I wiped the phone and the cache and installed the ROM through ROM Manager. It took about 20 minutes to install Cyanogen 7 on my HTC Hero (CDMA) but there weren’t any problems! When it first booted I’ll admit I was quite freaked out about the device bricking or something not working correctly the first time. Everything looked good EXCEPT the first thing I wanted to do was bring over my contact data again.

    WHOOPS! I don’t have any installed APPS right now and the app I used to back up my data (MyBackup Root). First thought was to load the Marketplace but CRAP! There is NO MARKETPLACE! Now what? I searched forum after forum and there was a lot of people explaining how to fix this but most of it made no sense. One reply said “it’s a CW setting” and looking through all the settings I could find I couldn’t figure out what the heck that was supposed to mean and wondered how a response like that could be helpful. There was one APP that was still installed and it was the ROM Manager that performed the very last backup of my phone. I opened it up and clicked DOWNLOAD ROM from the menu and it gave a few choices. I found out by trial and error that installing Google Apps from this menu will install Gmail and other misc. Google apps as well as the Marketplace. Once that was installed life was good again.

    I reinstalled MyBackup Root and performed a recovery of my data. It succeeded and required a reboot. SWEET! After hitting the power button the phone now has an UBER COOL REBOOT BUTTON! Upon reboot the entire screen changed from something navigatable to something obscenely difficult to figure out what to do. The icon I used to quickly access all my applications is now replaced with three circles on the bottom that, when clicked, all they say is they aren’t used with any applications yet. There was nothing about this on Google so it took over an hour to figure out how to get back so I could add every shortcut and widget back to my home. Messaging and Phone are under Applications! They aren’t widgets! So if you are looking around for those don’t be snooping in the wrong directory. Once everything was mostly back in order I used MyBackup Root again and did an application and media backup so the applications and photos/videos would come back. It was pretty straight forward and required a reboot.

    After about 7 hours of working on the Cyanogen ROM for the HTC Hero (CDMA) everything seems to be working well. The phone boots up at about the same speed but once the phone is “up” the applications move a lot faster. Getting APKs for the important Sprint Navigation wasn’t difficult but it wasn’t expected either. None of the recovery applications copied that over so it had to be redownloaded. The voicemail app, too, had to be reinstalled again for whatever reason. I haven’t yet received or sent any phone calls or texts yet or even tried Spring Navigation but once that is done I’ll be sure to leave updates below.

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    11

    WordPress Remote Poster v.03

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    WordPress Remote Poster v.03
    —————————————————–
    Script developed by and copyright by Ask-A-Geek.com. Ask-A-Geek.com assumes no liability and makes no claim of guarantee regarding the use of this script.

    License: Free for individuals, corporations and government agencies. Do not reproduce or redistribute this script without written permission from Ask-A-Geek.com
    —————————————————–

    At a glance
    ————————————
    1 ) About
    2 ) Version Release Date
    3 ) Requirements
    4 ) How to install on a server
    5 ) How to configure the script
    6 ) List of shortcodes
    7 ) How to use shortcodes
    8 ) Examples of how to use the shortcodes
    9 ) Questions? Problems? Love it?

    1) About
    ————————————
    WordPress Remote Poster allows users to post to their WordPress blogs by sending an email to themselves. The WordPress Remote Poster reads the emails, pulls out the neccessary information and feeds it to WordPress automatically allowing a user to post to their blog from anywhere they have an internet connection. It finishes up by removing the emails from the server.

    What makes this script different from other WordPress posters is its nature of security and integrity. In no way does WordPress Remote Poster interact with the database used to host the blog data. It navigates the forms as a user would and posts the information as if it were done manually. This ensures the database is secure and the original WordPress filters monitor the data before it is submitted.

    This script is written in Perl, not PHP. It was not designed to be an add-on or widget for WordPress. It is a standalone application.

    2) Version Release date
    ————————————
    March 25, 2011

    3) Requirements
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    A server running Perl.
    A server having the following Perl modules: WWW::Mechanize, Mail::POP3Client

    4) How to install on a server
    ————————————
    1) Transfer the aagwpposter.pl file as ASCII to your web server (make sure it is transferred into a location that can run Perl scripts such as a CGI-BIN).

    2) Change the permissions (CHMOD) of the aagwpposter.pl file to 755.

    5) How to configure the script
    ————————————
    1) Open the aagwpposter.pl file in a text editor (such as Notepad)
    2) Scroll down to the configuration section that is near the top (as shown below)
    ################################################
    # Change your settings below
    ################################################
    #######
    # Email/Server settings
    #######
    my $email_user = ‘secretemail@domain.com’;
    my $email_pass = ‘password’;
    my $email_server = ‘mail.domain.com’;
    my $file_backup = ‘/home/username/public_html/WPbackuplocation’;
    my $tag_check = ’1′;
    my $server_backup = ’1′;

    #######
    # Verification email settings
    #######
    my $path_to_sendmail = ‘/usr/sbin/sendmail’;
    my $email = ‘confirmation@email.com’;
    my $from_email = ‘noreply@domain.com’;
    my $subject = ‘WP post confirmation’;
    my $verification = ’1′;

    #######
    # WordPress settings
    #######
    my $username = ‘user’;
    my $password = ‘password’;
    my $url_to_sign_on = ‘http://domain.com/wp-login.php’;
    my $post_new = ‘http://domain.com/wp-admin/post-new.php’;

    ################################################
    # Do not make any edits below this line
    ################################################

    3) Edit the required fields as listed in the configuration section.
    my $email_user: change this to the user name of the email address you will be sending the emails to so they can get posted. In most cases the username IS the email address itself, sometimes it’s just USER instead of USER@domain.com.

    $email_pass: change this to the password of the email account listed above.

    $email_server: Determine the email server your email address uses and write it here. Every email host is different.

    $file_backup: This is the full folder path to the location on your server where you’ll have file backups saved. You can store files anywhere you have permissions on your server. Remember to create the folder name(s) after you edit the script so the script has a place to write the files!

    $tag_check: The only values this can be are 0 or 1. Change it to 0 if you don’t want the script to check each post for proper use of shortcodes or 1 if you want it to make sure posts are written properly. This will ensure that you don’t miss a TITLE tag that makes the rest of the post post improperly. Most people should use 1 as the value.

    $server_backup: The only values this can be are 0 or 1. Change it to 0 if you don’t want to record log files of each post the script adds to WordPress for you or 1 if you want backups made. This makes a backup copy of what you submitted in case something happens and it doesn’t post correctly you’ll still have the original post handy.

    $path_to_sendmail: Change this to the path of sendmail on the server. The default is the standard location of sendmail but edit it if your location is different.

    $email: Change this to the email address you want confirmation emails sent to after the script makes posts to WordPress.

    $from_email: Change this to the FROM email address that will be used in the confirmation emails.

    $subject: Change this to the email subject line of the confirmation email.

    $verification: The only values this can be are 0 or 1. Change it to 0 if you don’t want to receive confirmation emails or 1 if you do.

    $username: Change this to the WordPress username you want to post blogs with.

    $password: Change this to the password of the WordPress account you want to post blogs with.

    $url_to_sign_on: Because WordPress can be installed anywhere on a web server you need to change this to the login form (wp-login.php). In your browser navigate to the WordPress login area and copy and paste the location here. The page should end with wp-login.php.

    $post_new: Because WordPress can be installed anywhere on a web server you need to change this to the location of the post-new.php page. In your browser, sign into WordPress and go to the page that allows you to create new posts. It should end with post-new.php. Copy that location directly into here.
    4) Create the directory needed to make backups (as mentioned above under $server_backup). This is only necessary if you want to store backups.

    6) List of shortcodes
    ————————————
    Start of email [:start]
    Post title: [:title]
    Post tags: [:tags]
    Post category: [:categories]
    Post content: [:post]
    Post status: [:status]
    Post separator: ##########

    7) How to use shortcodes
    ————————————
    The only required shortcode is [:post]. The other ones are optional but what good is a blog post without that information? Everyone SHOULD use the [:start] tag but it is not required.

    Each shortcode has to be used twice (except [:start] and the post separator) if it is used at all- once as a start tag and once as an end tag. That is to say you wrap the shortcode around the text you are referencing. The start tag and the end tag are identical.
    IE: [:title]Hello world, WordPress Remote Poster made this![:title]

    The shortcode start and end tags can be on separate lines. For example, the code below will process smoothly:
    [:title]Hello world!
    Nice to meet you![:title]

    You may not nest shortcodes as the results will be entertaining to say the least. For example, the code below should not be used:
    [:title] Hello world! [:tags]hello, world[:tags] [:title]

    The [:start] tag is special as it tells the script when to start looking at the content of the email. This is to prevent any free email client from placing advertisement text at the top of your emails. It is used only once per email and it should be the very, very top of everything.

    There is no [:end] tag because the only data it cares about are within the shortcodes listed above. Once the last [:post] is processed no advertisement text will be included at the end of the post.

    The [:status] tag allows you to define how the post gets sent to WordPress. If this tag is left off or is anything BUT [:status]publish[:publish] the post will be posted in DRAFT mode. You must specifically call on PUBLISH for it to go live.

    The ########## separator is used when you want to write more than one blog post per email. Just separate each post with the separator and the script will post them separately. You can make as many posts in a single email as you’d like.

    Shortcodes don’t have to appear in any order with exception of the [:start] tag. If that is used it has to be at the top or everything above it will get ignored. This means you can use [:post] to add all the content of the blog posting before you outline what the title and tags will be.

    ** The [:categories] is special and takes a little more human intervention to work. You can only post to 1 category per post (future updates may fix this) and you need to know the category ID number. This is NOT the name of the category itself. You will need to look at the HTML source code of the page where you make new posts to see what number is associated with what category name. The below source code is from Ask-A-Geek.com to show an example.
    <ul>
    <li id=”category-3″ class=”popular-category”><label class=”selectit”>
    <input id=”in-category-3″ type=”checkbox” name=”post_category[]” value=”3″ /> Ask-A-Geek Exclusives</label></li>
    </ul>
    You will search the HTML for the title of one of your categories, in this example I knew Ask-A-Geek Exclusives what a category name so I searched for that. You see an <input id=”" type=”text” name=”" value=”3″ />

    8 ) Examples of how to use the shortcodes
    ————————————
    Example 1: email containing one post
    [:start]
    [:title]Hello world![:title]
    [:tags]hello, world, first post, yay![:tags]
    [:categories]1[:categories]
    [:status]publish[:publish]
    [:post]
    this is the coolest thing ever
    I posted this with WordPress Remote Poster from Ask-A-Geek.com
    [:post]

    Example 2: email containing more than one post (notice the start tag used only for the first post)
    [:start]
    [:title]Hello world![:title]
    [:tags]hello, world, first post, yay![:tags]
    [:categories]1[:categories]
    [:status]publish[:publish]
    [:post]
    this is the coolest thing ever
    I posted this with WordPress Remote Poster from Ask-A-Geek.com
    [:post]

    ##########

    [:title]Hello world 2[:title]
    [:tags]hello, world, first post, yay![:tags]
    [:categories]1[:categories]
    [:status]publish[:publish]
    [:post]
    this is the coolest thing ever
    I posted this with WordPress Remote Poster from Ask-A-Geek.com
    [:post]

    Example 3: basic post with the tags in random order
    [:start]
    [:status]publish[:publish]
    [:tags]hello, world, first post, yay![:tags]
    [:categories]1[:categories]
    [:post]
    this is the coolest thing ever
    I posted this with WordPress Remote Poster from Ask-A-Geek.com
    [:post]
    [:title]Hello world 2[:title]

    Example 4: not all shortcodes used
    [:start]
    [:title]Hello world![:title]
    [:post]
    this is the coolest thing ever
    I posted this with WordPress Remote Poster from Ask-A-Geek.com
    [:post]

    9) Questions? Problems? Love it?
    ————————————
    Please visit the WordPress Remote Poster page at [here] to ask any questions you may have or just post how much you love it! If you have ideas on how to improve it, please post them there as well.

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    WordPress Remote Poster

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    Ask-A-Geek.com Exclusive: WordPress Remote Poster script

    The following WordPress Remote Posting script is an Ask-A-Geek.com exclusive script. It was planned, written, tested and distributed through this web site.

    There are so many people out there asking for alternatives to POSTIE (another leading WordPress application that allows you to post to your blog via an email instead of having to log in and manually create a posting). Until now there really hasn’t been an alternative to remotely post to WordPress blogs and it seems like, from what others have complained about in forums, this is a problem. The ability to remotely post to WordPress via email makes blogging much more mobile. Anyone who has used POSTIE knows it barely works and when it does, it really messes up the data being passed to WordPress. In absolute frustration with POSTIE not working the way it should, I decided to design my own application to do it for me. After getting it to the point where it did everything I needed to do the idea, I decided to generalize the script and add more security so it can be released to all WordPress users.

    About the Ask-A-Geek WordPress Remote Poster script:
    The Ask-A-Geek.com WordPress Remote Poster allows anyone to post to their WordPress sites using nothing more than email and shortcodes. When a specially written email is written and sent to a private email address, the script reads the email and posts it to your WordPress site automatically.

    This allows you to post to your site from anywhere and anytime as long as you have internet access. Writing multiple posts at the same time? No problem! The Ask-A-Geek WordPress Remote Poster can handle numerous posts in the same email to make posting to WordPress even easier. It can also process multiple emails at the same time, too!

    The script offers the following features:
    Easy configuration (all set up in the Perl file itself, no need for a web interface)
    Full documentation with examples so you learn how to configure it and how to make it work
    Allows multiple blog posts to exist in the same email and have them post separately
    Allows multiple emails to be scanned, parsed, and posted at the same time
    Contains the following shortcodes (title, tags, categories and post)
    Shortcode integrity checker (optional: when activated it checks to make sure all shortcodes are where they should be)
    Shortcodes can exist ANYWHERE inside the individual post to make life easier
    Server archiving of posts (optional: creates a text file of all posts created by this WordPress Remote Poster)
    Ability to run as a cronjob or manually through a browser
    Email junk filtering (if posting from a free email client or phone that inputs advertisements in the text, this blocks EVERYTHING)
    Email confirmation (optional: send yourself an email confirmation every time a set of posts is created)
    It works! All features have been tested thoroughly. You won’t have problems with tags or categories not showing up.

    Script requirements:
    The script uses Perl meaning the web host needs to have Perl running on their system.

    The script uses two Perl modules that have to be installed or referenced in a library (WWW::Mechanize, Mail::POP3Client).

    Script download:
    Download the script free
    View the documentation

    Script Hosting:
    As an option to the free download we offer monthly/yearly hosting of the script for those that don’t want to set it up or don’t have the proper server requirements. We do all the configurations and set aside a special spot on our servers just for you. We’re also available for assistance whenever you need us.

    Current hosting plans are as follows:Script hosting only without server backups: $1 per month or $5 yearly.
    Script hosting only with server backups: $2 per month or $10 yearly.
    Script hosting WITH an ask-a-geek.com email address and server backups: $5 per month or $50 per year

    These prices are for script hosting only. The Ask-A-Geek.com WordPress Remote Poster script is completely free of charge.

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    WSUS Error Checker

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    Ask-A-Geek Exclusive Script: WSUS Error Checker

    This WSUS Error Checker script is useful for sys admins who work with software distributions through WSUS.  It will work on any system running ActiveState Perl and it doesn’t require any special modules to be installed.

    In short, the WSUS Error Checker prompts for a computer name on the network and retrieves the windowsupdate.log file. It reads the log file and reports back any errors that were encountered.  This saves the time from having to navigate and open the logs manually to see if there are any reported error messages.

    Instructions:
    (to run this script it is likely you’ll need to run it under a domain admin account)

    Save the file and rename it to a .pl extension (ie: wsus.pl).

    Edit the file and look at the line that reads my $log = “\$pcnamec$windowswindowsupdate.log“; and make sure the path is accurate for your environment. Minus the extra slashes, that reads: computernamec$windowswindowsupdate.log. The slashes are important so don’t remove them. Save the file with the new changes.

    Run the Perl script and when it prompts for a computer name type it in.

    That’s it! This can save you hours of work if you frequently use WSUS to diagnose issues with software deployments.

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